Danish court fines Iranian-born lady for racism while writing against Islam
26 Sep 2013 03:24 GMT
 
Copenhagen: A high court in Denmark fined a Danish-Iranian artist, FiroozehBazrafkan, of 5,000 kroner after she was found guilty of racism while making remarks against Islam and the Muslims.

Copenhagen: A high court in Denmark fined a Danish-Iranian artist, Firoozeh Bazrafkan, of 5,000 kroner after she was found guilty of racism while making remarks against Islam and the Muslims.

She was charged by the police of violating anti-racism legislationafter publishing a blog entry in infamous newspaper, Jyllands-Posten, in December 2011, in which she had stated, “I am very convinced that Muslim men around the world rape, abuse and kill their daughters. This is, according to my understanding as a Danish-Iranian, due to a defective and inhumane culture – if you can even call it a culture at all. But you can say, I think, that it is a defective and inhumane religion whose textbook, the Koran, is more immoral, deplorable and crazy than manuals of the two other global religions combined.”

An artist with a critical focus on Iran’s Islamic regime and religion in general, Bazrafkan argues in an interview that Danish anti-racism legislation should not apply to the critique of religion.

She said that she is not sorry for writing the blog in the newspaper but she is disappointed and angry because she should have the right to write and say what she wants. Her blog in the newspaper didn’t threaten anyone, it was a criticism of Islamic codes.

She commented, “The court argued that what I wrote about Muslim men was disdainful and a generalization. But that’s unfair, because there are many Islamic codes that are being used by Islamic men to justify their actions against women and children.”

While defending her pathetic actions, she said, “It’s important to remember that I did not write that all Muslim men committed horrible acts and used Islamic codes to justify them, I wrote that Muslim men around the world can do these things because it is allowed according to these codes.”

She spoke about her enmity with Iran, “I have also been critical of Judaism and Christianity but I was born in Iran as a Muslim. I have family members in Iran who don’t have the same democratic rights and freedom to express their anger as I do. I do my best to get the point out in my artwork and installations because I want to criticize the Iranian regime my way. If I want to be angry, I should have the right to be angry and call the Islamic regime anything I want. The state shouldn’t go in and take my rights.”

“My point is that I want to give men and women the rights to write whatever they want, I don’t care if it’s stupid or well formulated, people should just have the right to say what they want so long as they don’t threaten other people,” Bazrafkan concluded.



-- Al Arabiya Digital


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