World Condemns Egypt Deaths
06 Jul 2013 04:18 GMT
 

CAIRO - As the turmoil continued across Egyptian cities, the United States and United Nations have expressed concern about Friday's violence in Egypt in which at least 30 people were killed, fol (more)

CAIRO - As the turmoil continued across Egyptian cities, the United States and United Nations have expressed concern about Friday's violence in Egypt in which at least 30 people were killed, following the overthrow of President Mohammed Morsi.

"We call on all Egyptian leaders to condemn the use of force and to prevent further violence among their supporters," Jen Psaki, spokeswoman of the US state department, said in statement cited by the BBC on Saturday, July 6.

The UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon called for demonstrators to be protected.

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"The Secretary-General believes strongly that this is a critical juncture in which it is imperative for Egyptians to work together to chart a peaceful return to civilian control, constitutional order, and democratic governance," Ban's spokesman Farhan Haq said.

Haq added that it was for the people of Egypt to determine the way forward.

"Egypt's political leaders have a responsibility to signal, by their words and their actions, their commitment to a peaceful and democratic dialogue which includes all of Egypt's constituencies, including women," he added, referring to "horrifying reports of sexual violence" against women in Tahrir square.

Condemnations followed the outburst of violence targeting pro-Morsi protesters on Friday.

"Thirty-two people were killed and 1,138 were injured in Friday's clashes in 19 governorates, of whom 1,076 were moved to hospitals," Mohamed Sultan, head of the Egyptian Ambulance Organization, told Xinhua.

According to the health ministry, seven people were killed in the capital Cairo and 12 in Alexandria, who were killed by gunshots too.. Hundreds were injured in violence across the country.

The bloodshed started when millions of demonstrators gathered in Egyptian different squares for a “Friday of Rage,” billed as a peaceful protest of Morsi's ouster.

With hundreds of thousands staging a set-in in Rabea al Adaweya square in Nasr City, thousands of supporters of Morsi marched to the Cairo barracks of the Republican Guard chanting "down with military rule".

When protesters tried to hung pictures of Morsi on a barbed wire barrier around the military complex, troops opened fire, killing at least three demonstrators.

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Along with official condemnations, several protests were held around world capitals to reject Egypt coup and demand Morsi reinstate.

In Ankara, hundreds of protesters from several Turkish unions and non-governmental organizations held Friday a demonstration outside the Egyptian embassy to denounce the military ouster of President Morsi, Xinhua reported on Friday.

Turkey's ruling Justice and Development Party (AK Party) and main opposition Republican People's Party (CHP) also condemned the military coup in Egypt.

"Turkey is following with deep concern the latest developments in Egypt after the ouster of embattled President Mohamed Morsi," said the Turkish Foreign Ministry in a statement Thursday.

"After the removal of Morsi by the Egyptian armed forces and the suspension of constitution, the situation in Egypt has reached an extremely sensitive and alarming stage."

Other pro-Morsi supporters rallied at Egyptian embassy in Dublin Friday evening to protest his overthrow.

“We're here today to support democracy in Egypt and Dr Morsi - we gave him our vote, and then the army came in and break everything. Everything should be stopped,” Mohamed Omar, a Morsi supporter living in Dublin, told The Irish Times.

“The army should be sent back to the border or their camps and the civilians should control the country.

“We support him because we gave him our voice - it's not easy for someone to come in and say everything is finished, we don't accept this.

“We don't support the army controlling the country; for 50 years they controlled Egypt,” he added.

Morsi, Egypt's first freely elected president, is in detention, as are senior figures in the Brotherhood. Arrest warrants have been issued for some 300 others.

Reproduced with permission from OnIslam.net



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