Egypt Swears in Interim President
04 Jul 2013 04:18 GMT
 

CAIRO - The top judge of the Constitutional Court was sworn in as Egypt's interim president on Thursday, July 4, a day after the overthrow of elected president Mohamed Morsi, as security forces have issued arrested orders for (more)

CAIRO - The top judge of the Constitutional Court was sworn in as Egypt's interim president on Thursday, July 4, a day after the overthrow of elected president Mohamed Morsi, as security forces have issued arrested orders for Muslim Brotherhood leaders.

"I swear to preserve the system of the republic, and respect the constitution and law, and guard the people's interests,” Adli Mansour as he took the oath of office in the Supreme Constitutional Court.

Mansour, 69, was installed a day after the army toppled President Mohamed Morsi, who was elected last year.
Egypt Army Ousts Islamist President

"A salute to the Egyptian people for correcting on June 30 the path of this glorious revolution," he said, in reference to mass protests against Moris.

Morsi was toppled by the army after hundreds of thousands of protestors took to the streets demanding early election.

Opponents accused the Islamist president of being incompetent to run Egypt's affairs and side with his allies.

But supporters staged rival protests to defend Morsi's legitimacy and insisted that the Islamist leader must complete his four-year term.

An army deadline for Morsi and the opposition to find a solution to the crisis expired without making a breakthrough.

Ousting the Islamist president, the army unveiled a roadmap to solve the crisis, including the suspension of the constitution and installing Mansour as an interim president.

The roadmap also includes the formation of a government of technocrats to run Egypt during a transition period.

New presidential election will be held to be followed by parliamentary polls.

A committee will be formed of representatives of sects of Egyptian society to amend the suspended constitution. A new commission will be formed to achieve societal reconciliation.

Mansour praised the army for having "always been the conscience of the nation" and "not hesitating for a moment to meet the call of the nation and people".

The overthrow triggered mass celebrations among opponents, who filled Tahrir square, danced in the streets and held Egyptian flags.

Clashes erupted in a number of Egyptian provinces in the wake of Morsi's fall, leaving at least 14 people dead.

Arrests

The interim president used his inauguration to hold out an olive branch to the Muslim Brotherhood.

"The Muslim Brotherhood are part of this people and are invited to participate in building the nation as nobody will be excluded,” Mansour said.

“And if they respond to the invitation, they will be welcomed.”

The call comes amid a security crackdown on Brotherhood leaders in the wake of Morsi's overthrow.

Leader of the Brotherhood's Freedom and Justice Party Saad al-Katatni and the group's deputy leader Rashad Bayoumi were arrested and transferred to prison.

Arrest warrants were also issued for Brotherhood supreme guide Mohamed Badie and his deputy Khairat el-Shater, according to judicial and army sources.

The two men have been charged with inciting violence against protesters outside the Brotherhood's headquarters in Cairo that was attacked on Saturday night.

A senior Brotherhood politician, Essam El-Erian, said the movement would take a long view of the political setback.

Writing on Facebook, he said "waves of sympathy" for the Brotherhood would rise gradually over time and that the country's Islamist leaders were overthrown before they had a chance to succeed."The end of the coup will end faster than you imagine," he added.

Reproduced with permission from OnIslam.net



-- OnIslam


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