Grisly Murder Shocks Nepal Muslims
22 May 2013 08:18 GMT
 

CAIRO - The murder of a Muslim lawmaker in Nepal is sparking outrage in Nepal, amid accusations of targeting Muslims in the Hindu-majority Asian country.

“It appears that every time a Muslim gets popular, or reaches a high (more)

CAIRO - The murder of a Muslim lawmaker in Nepal is sparking outrage in Nepal, amid accusations of targeting Muslims in the Hindu-majority Asian country.

“It appears that every time a Muslim gets popular, or reaches a high position in this country, their fate is to get murdered,” Mohammed Nizamuddin, senior vice-chairman of the Muslim Association of Nepal, told a rally in Kalyanpur in south-eastern Nepal cited by The Hindu on Wednesday, May 22.

Muslim legislator Sadrul Miya Haque was found dead I his home by one of his employees on Tuesday.

Police said the Constituent Assembly member had his throat slit by an anonymous attacker.

“We don't think, for now, that the murder was due to monetary reasons,” said Kesh Bahadur Shahi, a DIG at the Central Investigation Bureau.

“But we do think the murderer might be somebody he knew.”

The grisly murder has sparked angry protests from the Muslim community in the Asian country.

Muslim protestors called on the government to investigate the murder to bring perpetrators to justice.

The murder came after Faizal Ahmed, general secretary of Islamic Sangh Nepal, was assassinated in broad daylight at the heart of the capital.

It also followed the killing of prominent media entrepreneur Jamim Shah.

“However, no evidence has surfaced that Mr. Haque's murder is connected with the previous assassinations,” police sources said.

Muslim leaders say that Nepalese Muslims are taking the full brunt of the conflict between Muslim-majority Pakistan and Hindu-majority India.

“Nepali Muslims are paying the price of conflict between India and Pakistan,” Nizamuddin said.

According to the CIA World Fact Book, Muslims constitute 4.2 percent of Nepal's 28-million population.

Nepal was the world's only Hindu state till 2006 when the parliament amended the constitution and declared it a secular state.

Most of Nepal's Muslims live in the southern plains on the borders with India.Residents of impoverished southern belt say they have long been excluded from Kathmandu's corridors of power and want increased representation in the government and army.

Reproduced with permission from OnIslam.net



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