Britons Warn Against Anti-Islam Fascism
08 Apr 2013 04:18 GMT
 

CAIRO - Rejecting the hateful anti-Islam message, anti-fascist groups in England's north east city of Sunderland have accused far-right groups of spreading anti-Muslim hatred across the city via internet social networks.

“W (more)

CAIRO - Rejecting the hateful anti-Islam message, anti-fascist groups in England's north east city of Sunderland have accused far-right groups of spreading anti-Muslim hatred across the city via internet social networks.

“We know there is a Sunderland English Defence League (EDL) running in the city, but we know other groups are also getting involved with them,” a spokesman for the Tyne and Wear Anti-Fascist Association (TWAFA) told Sunderland Echo on Monday, April 8.

“This is a network that is starting to establish itself and the issue with the mosque has given them an excuse to voice their views.”

Britons Triumph Anti-Islam Rightists Defeat

Far-right Unites Against Europe Muslims

UK Far-Right Group Forms New Party

Modern UK Fascism Muslim Hatred

Exposing Mindset of UK Far-right

Uniting against fascist groups, activists from TWAFA and Hope not Hate have been raising concerns about anti-Muslim messages which flooded social networks recently.

For example, they claimed that Wearsider using the alias “Angel United Patriots” is playing a central role in organizing Far Right demonstrations against Muslims living in Sunderland.

The groups have also claimed that the user behind “Angel” was among crowds of EDL supporters chanting anti-Muslim slogans at last month's demo against proposals for a new mosque of St Mark's Road in Millfield.

Online postings suggested that “Angel” is a primary mover in getting Far Right activities “up and running in Sunderland”.

Comments have also been left in which Muslims in the city are described as “Muzrats” and “Muzzies”.

One post says: “Just had a Muzrat in shop asking why I don't have any clothes for her”.

Rejecting the hate messages, both Hope not Hate and TWAFA have condemned the racist comments, branding them “disgusting and derogatory”.

The EDL, a far-right group that emerged in 2009, has held numerous protests against what it calls “Islamic extremism” in Britain.

Far-right groups like the EDL and the British National Party (BNP) are playing the card of immigration to stoke sentiment against Muslims and immigrants.

Concerns about the growing far-right extremism in Sunderland have grown in recent months following a series of protests over a proposal for a new mosque.

Three people were arrested during last month's protest which saw up to 80 EDL demonstrators clash with anti-fascist organizations.

British Muslims, estimated at nearly 2.7 million, have been in the eye of storm since the 7/7 2005 attacks.

A Financial Times opinion poll showed that Britain is the most suspicious nation about Muslims.

A poll of the Evening Standard found that a sizable section of London residents harbor negative opinions about Muslims.

The anti-Muslim tide has also been on the rise across Europe, with several countries are restricting the freedom of Muslims to wearing face-veil and building mosques.

Reproduced with permission from OnIslam.net



-- OnIslam


© islamonline.com