India Muslims Explore Qur’an Message
03 Mar 2013 01:18 GMT
 

CAIRO - Exploring the greatness of the Muslim Holy Book, a leading mosque in the north Indian state of Bihar is organizing a new discourse on the Noble Qu'ran, inviting religious leaders to share their debut on the Qur'anic m (more)

CAIRO - Exploring the greatness of the Muslim Holy Book, a leading mosque in the north Indian state of Bihar is organizing a new discourse on the Noble Qu'ran, inviting religious leaders to share their debut on the Qur'anic message.

"It is wrong to treat Qur'an as a religious book of Muslims,” Dr Ahmad Abdul Hai, an eminent surgeon, told The Times of India on Sunday, March 3.“This holy book speaks volumes about humanity and in today's world of turmoil one can read and understand this book for real mental peace.”

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The idea came to Abdul Hai to give Muslim worshippers at the mosque at the Hai commercial complex in Patna a better explanation of the Qur'an.

The mosque, the first in the city to start such a discourse, has invited prominent scholars to give their input about the Qur'an.

Depicting each verse of the holy Qur'an in a separate session, each verse is translated through PowerPoint presentation and then its message explained to the audience.

Billed as 'Dars-e-Quran', or teaching of the holy book, people of other religions also visit the mosque to listen to the discourse.

The discourse on Qur'anic verses first started from 1990 and lasted all over the past 23 years.

The first discourse lasted from 1990 and was concluded in 2002.

The second round began the same year and ended in the first week of March 2013, taking over 11 years for the completion of one round.

Themed “Jashn-e-Qur'an”, the new round will begin on Sunday, March 10 on Qur'anic verses and their translation, theme, context and background would be launched under the title of 'Jashn-e-Quran'.

Inclusive Message

The discourse has won praise for helping highlight the universal message of the Noble Qur'an.

“The mosque is a place not only for prayers but also to deliberate on other issues of life,” Dr Abdul Hai said.

The Patna mosque was also unique in the sense that women come here to pray on Fridays and join the special prayers in the night during the month of Ramadan.

There are very few mosques in the country which are open to women.

The Noble Qur'an consists of 114 Surah (chapters) of varying lengths.

Memorizing the Holy Qur'an is one of the most important ways to preserve Allah's message.

The others are to publish and distribute the book, or the text on the Internet and to recite the parts that one knows to other people.

Prophet Muhammad (peace and blessing be upon him) said: “The best amongst you is the one who learns the Qur'an and teaches it.”Muslims account for 160 million of India's 1.1 billion people, the world's third-largest Muslim population after those of Indonesia and Pakistan.

Reproduced with permission from OnIslam.net



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