Muslims celebrate Eid-al-Adha with religious fervor
05 Nov 2012 06:12 GMT
 
Jeddah: Muslims across the world have celebrated Eid-al-Adha with great zeal and religious fervor and slaughtered millions of animals in the name of Allah Almighty following the Sunnah of Prophet Ibrahim (A.S.) as he had shown no hesitation in sacrificing his beloved son, Prophet Ismail (A.S.), in the Allah’s name thousands of years ago. The religious zeal of the Muslims was multiplied when they saw their brethren perform the Hajj in the holy city of Makkah in Saudi Arabia which is the foremost desire of every Muslim to visit the holy place. By Farhan Iqbal

Jeddah: Muslims across the world have celebrated Eid-al-Adha with great zeal and religious fervor and slaughtered millions of animals in the name of Allah Almighty following the Sunnah of Prophet Ibrahim (A.S.) as he had shown no hesitation in sacrificing his beloved son, Prophet Ismail (A.S.), in the Allah’s name thousands of years ago. The religious zeal of the Muslims was multiplied when they saw their brethren perform the Hajj in the holy city of Makkah in Saudi Arabia which is the foremost desire of every Muslim to visit the holy place.

Every Muslim in every nook and corner of the world with sufficient financial means slaughter Halal animals on Eid-al-Adha to please Allah and represent they are ready to sacrifice their everything in the way of Allah whenever required as Allah’s Prophet Ibrahim (A.S.) was ready to sacrifice even his beloved son when he saw a dream of sacrificing Prophet Ismail (A.S.) in the way of Allah. Prophet Ibrahim (A.S.) decided to slaughter his son but when he tried to cut the throat his son, the knife did not work and instead Allah sent a sheep from paradise that Prophet Ibrahim (A.S.) slaughtered and thanked Allah. After thousands of years, Muslims have been following the Sunnah of Ibrahim (A.S.) and will continue to do so till the end of this world.

This time of year has marked one of Islam’s most sacred celebrations of Eid-al-Adha and it has been complimented well with the height of the Hajj and more than three million Muslims from different parts of the world have been blessed with Hajj in the holy city of Makkah this year.

Eid-al-Adha fell on Friday in the Middle East, Europe and America whereas in other parts of world, it fell on Saturday ended on Monday which is also the last day of the Hajj.

There has been mixed condition of law and order situation in the Islamic world on Eid-al-Adha as there was complete peace in many of the Muslim countries but there is presence of war and unrest in some of the Muslim countries like Palestine, Syria etc.

However, there is marvelous scene in Palestinian cities of the street art communities which are made to welcome pilgrims home.

Fires, ritual animal slaughter (and sharing that meat with the poor) and feasts are among the cherished celebratory customs on Eid-al-Adha.

There has been much debate about the role of meat in the celebration. In 2011, Jordanian Princess Alia spoke about the importance of humane animal slaughter when celebrating Eid-al-Adha.

There is a growing awareness that customs in some areas of the Middle East, such as making bonfires by burning trash and tyres, can harm the environment.

Dr. Hammoud al-Awdi, a sociologist at Sanaa University in Yemen, said, “This custom (burning trash) might harm the environment but it comes from the countryside, where children would collect firewood and place it in piles to burn on the eve of Eid.”

Many Muslims around the world are proactively engaging the ancient traditions in new ways, seeking to revive more sustainable, traditional practices and create new environmentally conscious ways to celebrate.

For many families in the Middle East, this year’s holiday has been marked by fear and bloodshed. In Syria, innocent civilians were killed near a children’s playground in Daf-al-Shok, a Sunni residential neighborhood in southern Damascus. Al-Awdi also said that public fear is also tangible in Yemen’s capital.

To celebrate Eid-al-Adha, people strolled in the city’s gardens or take quick trips, but were careful to return home before dark, he added.



-- Al Arabiya Digital


© islamonline.com