Jerusalem Israel’s Capital: Romney
20 Aug 2012 08:20 GMT
 

OCCUPIED JERUSALEM - US Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney has invited Palestinian anger by saying that Al-Quds (occupied Jerusalem) is Israel's capital, ignoring their own claim of the holy city.

"We condemn his (more)

OCCUPIED JERUSALEM - US Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney has invited Palestinian anger by saying that Al-Quds (occupied Jerusalem) is Israel's capital, ignoring their own claim of the holy city.

"We condemn his statements,” chief Palestinian negotiator Saeb Erekat told Reuters on Monday, July 30.

“Those who speak about the two-state solution should know that there can be no Palestinian state without East Jerusalem.”
Al-Quds: The Olive City (Folder)

Romney, who seeks to beat Democrat president Barack Obama in the November election, has said that Jerusalem is the capital of Israel.

"A nation has the capacity to choose its own capital city, and Jerusalem is Israel's capital," Romney told CNN's Wolf Blitzer in an interview set to air Monday.

"I think it's long been the policy to ultimately have our embassy in the nation's capital of Jerusalem."

Al-Quds is home to Al-Haram Al-Sharif, which includes Islam's third holiest shrine Al-Aqsa Mosque, and represents the heart of the Arab-Israeli conflict.

Israel occupied the holy city in the 1967 war and later annexed it in a move not recognized by the international community or UN resolutions.

Most countries, including the United States, have not recognized Israel's declaration and have kept their embassies in the coastal city of Tel Aviv.

Previous US presidential candidates, including Senator Obama in June 2008, have referred to Jerusalem as Israel's capital ahead of elections, only to row back when taking power and suggest the issue should be resolved by negotiations.

The Republican hopeful refused to be pinned down on whether he would recognize Jerusalem as Israel's capital if he beats Obama and wins the White House.

"A nation has the capacity to choose its own capital city, and Jerusalem is Israel's capital," he said.

"I think it's long been the policy of our country to ultimately have our embassy in the nation's capital, Jerusalem. The decision to actually make the move is one, if I were president, I would want to take in consultation with the leadership of the (Israeli) government which exists at that time. So I would follow the same policy we have in the past."

Romney, a former governor of Massachusetts, arrived in Israel on Sunday on a two-day visit to present himself as a close ally to Israel in the November election.

Romney met Palestinian Prime Minister Salam Fayyad briefly in Jerusalem on Sunday, but did not travel to the nearby occupied West Bank, focusing primarily on Israeli leaders.

Hypocrisy

Palestinian officials have criticized the Republican candidate for seeking to win votes at the expense of Palestinian rights.

"What this man is doing here is just promoting extremism, violence and hatred, and this is absolutely unacceptable," Erekat told Reuters.

"His statements are just rewarding the occupation and aggression."

A senior aide to Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas, Nabil Abu Rdeineh, said Romney's statements were unhelpful, stood in the way of a peace settlement and "contradict the previous positions held by the American administration".

Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO) secretary-general Yasser Abed Rabbo was also critical.

"American policy makers must abandon hypocrisy and stop attempting to gain votes at the expense of the Palestinian people's rights."

"Mr Romney must understand that such an era has ended and Arab nations who are rebelling for the sake of freedom and dignity will not allow him to mess with their fates in order to win some votes."

Seeking American Jewish and fundamentalist Christian votes, Romney has criticized Obama on Israel, alleging last year that the Democrat leader had "thrown Israel under a bus" in pushing hard for a two-state solution between Israel and the Palestinians.

Direct peace talks brokered by Washington ground to a halt in 2010 and attempts to get the two sides back to the negotiating table have since failed.

Romney did not criticize Obama by name during his two-day stay but made some pointed criticisms of his policies.

Israeli Defense Minister Ehud Barak made clear on Monday he was happy with the support received from the U.S. president."This American administration of Obama has been giving unprecedented backing to Israel's security ... This administration has done a lot to maintain Israel's qualitative advantage," he told Israel Radio.

Reproduced with permission from OnIslam.net



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