Democratic Libya Awaits `Eid
17 Aug 2012 04:18 GMT
 

TRIPOLI - Under their first freely elected national assembly, Libyans are joyfully anticipating `Eid Al-Fitr, which marks the end of Ramadan, filled with hope for a better future without long-term leader Muammar Gaddafi.

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TRIPOLI - Under their first freely elected national assembly, Libyans are joyfully anticipating `Eid Al-Fitr, which marks the end of Ramadan, filled with hope for a better future without long-term leader Muammar Gaddafi.

“Regarding this Eid - it is the first time we are experiencing it without Gaddafi,” one shopper, Rawad Youssef, told Reuters on Friday, August 17.

“We thank God, we are very happy and the situation is very stable.”

All About `Eid Al-Fitr

When is Your `Eid?

`Eid Al-Fitr is one the two main Islamic religious festivals along with `Eid Al-Adha.

During `Eid days, families and friends exchange visits to express well wishes and children, wearing new clothes bought especially for `Eid, enjoy going out in parks and open fields.

This `Eid, to be celebrated on Saturday or Sunday, is the first for Libya since the death of the former dictator Gaddafi.

With a few hours before the `Eid celebrations, Tripoli residents went to market to buy new clothes and festive food for the forthcoming occasion.

“I feel like any Libyan citizen - I feel happy,” Tripoli resident Ezz el-Deen Mohammed said Libyans were happy Gaddafi's rule came to an end.

“The important thing is that we have got rid of the tyrant,” he added.

He added that those who lost their lives in last year's fighting should also be remembered at the time of Eid.

“At the same time Eid reminds me of the people who lost their lives we must not forget them,” Mohammed said.

Democratic Libya

In a mood of happy anticipation under a newly elected national assembly, Libyans prepared for special `Eid celebrations this year.

“During this Eid we thank God all Libyans are happy and united under one idea which is there is only one Libya - not just east or west,” Tripoli resident, Jamal al-Gnedi, said.

Al-Gnedi, stressed the important work which has been done to unify the country, following the conflict.

Libya's ruling council handed over power to a newly elected national assembly last week in the North African country's first peaceful transition of power in its modern history.

Mohammed Magarief, a veteran Qaddafi opponent, was picked by the 200-member congress as its head.

Reproduced with permission from OnIslam.net



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