Azhar Rejects Egypt Civil Disobedience
09 Feb 2012 05:19 GMT
 

CAIRO - The highest Muslim and Christian religious bodies in Egypt have rejected calls for civil disobedience in the crisis-hit country.

"The sincere patriot has to shun the calls of some political trends which aim to bring (more)

CAIRO - The highest Muslim and Christian religious bodies in Egypt have rejected calls for civil disobedience in the crisis-hit country.

"The sincere patriot has to shun the calls of some political trends which aim to bring the country to knees and wreck havoc on the economy," Grand Imam of Al-Azhar Dr. Ahmed Al-Tayyeb said in a televised address on Wednesday, February 8.

"The teachings of Islam provide against hampering production and work since stipulations of the Holy Qur'an enshrine the value of good work and links it to faith.”

Some youth and revolutionary groups have called for a general strike and civil disobedience on Saturday, February 11, which marks the first anniversary of Mubarak's ouster in a popular revolt.

Organizers argue that the strike aims to pile pressures on the ruling military council to hand over power to a civilian authority.

The call comes following days of deadly clashes between protestors and security forces in Cairo and several Egyptian cities, which left at least 15 people dead.

Responding to the calls, Egypt's military rulers have ordered the deployment of more soldiers and tanks across the country.

The military council said in a statement that it would send patrols across the country to "maintain the security ... of public, private and state buildings", Reuters reported.

Lieutenant General Sami Enan, the armed forces chief of staff, urged Egyptians to "protect the security and stability of the country through work and production," the state news agency MENA reported.

Prime Minister Kamal al-Ganzouri also described calls for civil disobedience as part of a plan to "overthrow the state ..." and said all Egyptians should unite to get through the crises and dangers the country was facing.

The military council has been facing accusations of dragging feet on handing over power to civilians, a claim denied by the junta.

Earlier this week, the council decided to open nominations for the country's presidential election by March 10.

Though no date has been yet set for the elections, which are originally set for June, the polls are now expected to be held by May.

Against Religion

Egypt's Grand Mufti Ali Gomaa has also warned that civil disobedience would have a grave impact on the country.

“The calls for civil disobedience can only worsen the economic conditions and daily life of citizens, put the civilian lives in jeopardy, and dismantle the state,” he said.

The Supreme Council of the Islamic Affairs also rejected calls for civil disobedience in Egypt.

“Such calls are unacceptable and unjustifiable not only for their inconsistence with the Islamic teachings but also for the fact that they are not the proper means for expressing views in the post-revolution era,” SCIA Secretary General Dr Mahmoud Awadain said.

Egypt's Orthodox Coptic Church has also reiterated rejection of calls for civil disobedience.

“The civil disobedience is against religion,” Pope Shenouda said during his weekly sermon on Wednesday, according to MENA news agency.

Major Islamist groups, including the powerful Muslim Brotherhood, have already rejected calls for civil disobedience.

“Civil disobedience and general strike would worsen the already bad economic, social and service situation,” the Muslim Brotherhood said in a statement.“This would lead to disintegrate the country and bring it down.”

Reproduced with permission from OnIslam.net



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