California Same-sex Marriage Under Fire
08 Feb 2012 05:19 GMT
 

CAIRO - A court ruling striking down a ban on same-sex marriages in America's most populous state of California is drawing fire for running counter to religious teachings.

"I have to go biblical on that," Marvin Ellis, 51, (more)

CAIRO - A court ruling striking down a ban on same-sex marriages in America's most populous state of California is drawing fire for running counter to religious teachings.

"I have to go biblical on that," Marvin Ellis, 51, of North Hollywood, told the Contra Costa Times on Wednesday, February 8.

"A man should be with another woman, not another man," added Ellis, who was selling umbrellas in a steady drizzle outside the North Hollywood Red Line station.

The Bible, Ellis added, refers to Adam and Eve -- "not Adam and Steve."
Gay Marriage: Islamic View

A federal appeals court on Tuesday struck down a ban on the same-sex marriages in California.

The three-judge panel in the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that an amendment to the California state constitution banning same-sex marriages violated principles of due process and equal protection under the law.

"Proposition 8 serves no purpose, and has no effect, other than to lessen the status and human dignity of gays and lesbians in California," the 2-1 opinion said.

"The constitution simply does not allow for laws of this sort."

But the court did not address whether marriage was a fundamental right available to same-sex couples as well as heterosexuals, focusing instead specifically on Prop 8.

Supporters of the same-sex marriage hailed the ruling as a victory.

"This is a major victory for gays and lesbians," said Los Angeles City Councilman Bill Rosendahl, the only openly gay member of the council.

"This is great, we won," he said. "What this means is it puts us on a step toward equal rights with heterosexuals.

Some lawyers predicted that the narrow ruling would lead the Supreme Court to limit itself to deciding on the California measure or to refusing the case altogether.

Affront

But opponents lamented the verdict as slap to the majority of Californians, who support the ban.

"I think the voters in California should be respected," said Robert Orum, 51, a Los Angeles resident.

State Sen. Sharon Runner, R-Antelope Valley, agreed.

"Today's court decision is an affront to the voters of California," Runner said.

"Proposition 8 was approved by the people of this state. Our democracy is based on the power of individuals and their right to express their voice through the ballot box.

“This court decision not only disregarded voters' rights, it muffled their democratic freedoms," he said.

California joined the vast majority of US states in outlawing same-sex marriage in 2008, when voters passed the ban known as Proposition 8.

Gay marriage is legal in only six of 50 US states -- Connecticut, Iowa, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Vermont and New York as well as in the federal capital city Washington.

"Today, unelected judges cast aside the will of the people of California who voted to protect traditional marriage," said Republican presidential frontrunner Mitt Romney, reported Agence France-Presse  (AFP).

"This decision does not end this fight and I expect it to go to the Supreme Court. That prospect underscores the vital importance of this election and the movement to preserve our values."

Same-sex relationship and marriage are totally prohibited in Islam as well as in all divine religions.

Islam teaches that believers should neither do the obscene acts, nor in any way indulge in their propagation.The Catholic Church teaches that homosexuality is not a sin, but considers homosexual intercourse as sinful.

Reproduced with permission from OnIslam.net



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