Supplication based on name & date of birth
27 Aug 2011 10:16 GMT
 
There is a program on the radio where a woman who hosts the show provides suitable supplications to girls that she alleges will facilitate their getting married. Each girl is provided with a tailor-made supplication on the basis of her name, her mother’s name, and her date of birth. Men likewise call in and inquire about what they should recite to increase their income and health. She might advise someone to read Sûrah Yâsîn twenty times or “Lâ hawla wa lâ quwwata illâ billâh” one hundred times in the morning and at night. She prescribes reading other verses of the Qur’ân so many times to bring about various result. She also predicts the future on the basis of the person’s name, the mother’s name, and the date of birth, but then says that all outcomes are by the permission of Allah. Is this a form of astrology?

Answered by

Sheikh `Abd al-Rahmân al-Barrâk

The conduct you describe is false and erroneous. Her claims that reading certain verses will produce these very specific outcomes are false. Her tying those readings and supplication in with the person’s name, the mother’s name, and the date of birth is also false.

Her claim to predict the future is false, as is her tying those predictions in with the person’s name, the mother’s name, and the date of birth.

This practice is a form of astrology that seeks to arrive at knowledge of the unseen. This woman is either a genuine practitioner of astrology or, as is more likely, a fraud who does not know what she is doing.

Her saying that: “It only happens by Allah’s permission” is merely a cover-up to deceive the gullible.

Muslims should be wary of these practices and warn others against them. It is forbidden to ask this woman anything, since she is a soothsayer. The Prophet (peace be upon him) said: “If someone goes to a fortune teller and asks about anything, then his prayers will not be accepted for forty days.” [Sahîh Muslim (2230)]

The Prophet (peace be upon him) also said: “Whoever goes to asks a diviner or a fortune teller and then believes what he says has disbelieved in what was sent to Muhammad.” [Musnad Ahmad (9171) Sunan Abî Dâwûd (3902) Sunan al-Tirmidhî (135) and Sunan Ibn Mâjah (639)]

It makes no difference whether the person visits a soothsayer at his place of practice or consults with the soothsayer by phone.

Source: Islam Today



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