Islam, Islamic, Islamic News, Fatwa's and Islamic Business/Finance with Islam Online - The premier and trusted provider of online Islamic content.

Egypt’s President Boosts Syrians Morale

Published: 08/07/2012 08:18:56 PM GMT
Related Stories

CAIRO - Singling out the Syrian uprising in his first official speech, Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi boosted the Syrian people's morale after pledging to spare no effort to support revolutionaries in their struggle for fre (more)

CAIRO - Singling out the Syrian uprising in his first official speech, Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi boosted the Syrian people's morale after pledging to spare no effort to support revolutionaries in their struggle for freedom.

“God be with you!” said Musab Al Hamadee, an activist who was present and relayed the fighters' reactions to the speech over Skype, The Washington Post reported on Sunday, July 1.

Following the speech closely, Free Syrian Army fighters watched Morsi's speech as he singled out the uprising in Syria in which thousands of lives were lost in daily battles against the forces of President Bashar al-Assad over the past sixteen months.New Egypt: Rebirth of a Nation

“This convinces us that all revolutions will succeed,” Al Hamadee said.

“We are more optimistic now.”

More than 10,000 have been killed in 16 months of bloody crackdowns by Syrian President Bashar Al-Assad's security forces on anti-regime protestors.

International pressures have failed to halt violence in the pivotal Arab country, prompting speculations of launching a Libya-style military action against Syria.

The inauguration of Morsi, the first time a Muslim Brotherhood member ascends to top position in Arab countries, is expected to boost Syria's Brothers trying with other political forces to topple Assad's regime.

“It makes me feel proud, and I am also feeling the challenge the Muslim Brotherhood is facing to prove to the world that the Muslim Brotherhood is capable of running countries,” Drobi said of Morsi's victory.

“This will prove not only to Arabs, but the whole globe, that the Muslim Brotherhood is a threat to nobody.”

Members of the Syrian Muslim Brotherhood are planning to meet with Morsi in Cairo this week to explore how Egypt can help the Syrian effort to overthrow Al Assad, said Molham Al Drobi, a senior figure in the Syrian movement.

A key request will be for Egypt to prevent passage through the Suez Canal for Russian and Iranian ships supplying weapons to the Syrian government

Doubts

Though welcomed by Syrian people, some activists expressed misgivings about the expected rise of Muslim Brotherhood in Syria.

“The secular forces in the revolution, of which there are many, see that the Brotherhood is trying to push its agenda on the backs of the revolutionaries, so there is this negative reaction,” said Shakeeb Al Jabri, who is based in Beirut.

Members of Syrian minorities, including Christians, Alawites and Kurds, share similar concerns, said Emile Hokayem of the International Institute for Strategic Studies, who is based in Bahrain.

Yet, other analysts said Egypt, consumed by domestic politics and the challenges of its faltering economy, still has a long way before regaining its long-squandered role as the region's dominant power.

“Cairo will continue to be the non-player . . . that it has been for quite some time,” Robert Satloff of the Washington Institute for Near East Policy wrote last week.

“But the potent imagery of Brotherhood victory is likely to transcend that gritty reality,” he added.

“The shock waves will be felt across the Middle East.”

The Syrian Brotherhood is a branch of the Sunni Muslim movement founded in Egypt in 1928.

It was a minor political player before a 1963 Baath Party coup but its support grew under the authoritarian 30-year rule of Hafez al-Assad, as his minority Alawite community dominated the majority Sunni country.

The group led a revolt against Assad's rule in 1982, prompting the government to launch a bloody crackdown on the town of Hama, leaving tens of thousands of people dead.

The Brotherhood became a dominant force in the revolt against the 11-year rule of Asssad's son, Bashar, in which thousands of people have been killed.

The group is an active member in the umbrella opposition Syrian National Council (SNC), which is led by Paris-based professor Bourhan Ghalioun.

Reproduced with permission from OnIslam.net




Advertisement







Advertisment