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Egyptians Pray for Peace in Ramadan

Published: 17/07/2013 04:18:03 PM GMT
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CAIRO - The holy fasting month of Ramadan is bringing hopes for the Egyptians to restore peace after days of bloodshed in the wake of the army's removal of elected President Mohamed Morsi. Ramadan is the only thing left fo (more)

CAIRO - The holy fasting month of Ramadan is bringing hopes for the Egyptians to restore peace after days of bloodshed in the wake of the army's removal of elected President Mohamed Morsi.

"Ramadan is the only thing left for Egyptians," Ali Mohamed told Reuters.

"Let's hope it brings calm and change - nothing else seems to be working."Egypt has been thrown into turmoil in the wake of Morsi's overthrow by the army last week after massive protests against his regime.

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Thousands of the toppled president have been camping in Cairo to demand his return to power.

“I am sure that the advent of Ramadan will bring joy to the Egyptian people and Mohamed Morsi will be amongst us once again, praying with us, and God willing we will celebrate `Eid together,” pro-Morsi supporter told Euronews.

Across Egypt, the usual joy of the holy fasting month is almost absent among the Egyptians.

Seasonal stalls selling Ramadan lanterns are scarcer than usual as well as those offering honey and nut pastries for iftar.

Many of Cairo's coffee shops are closed, or distinctly less festive.

“The most difficult thing is to see a Muslim killed by another Egyptian Muslim,” another Morsi supporter said.

“We are starting Ramadan but we don't feel its happiness, how can I feel happy when our brothers were killed?”

More than 50 Morsi loyalists were killed outside the Republican Guards headquarters, where ousted president is believed to be held.

While the Muslim Brotherhood accused security sources of attacking the protestors, the army said a terrorist group had tried to storm the compound.

Scores of Egyptians have also been killed in deadly clashes between Morsi's supporters and opponents across the country.

Religious Retreat

Many Egyptians are praying that Ramadan will bring back peace and tranquility to their country.

“Oh, Lord! What has happened to us? Please help us," Ali Mohamed, a 52-year-old mechanic, told Reuters, raising his hands skywards as he stepped down his ladder, trailing a rope of small, colored glass lamps, known as fanous.

In the past years, he put lights up for his neighborhood of Abdeen a couple of days ago to be ready for the start of Ramadan.

But the bloodshed in his country has soured his mood.

"I never imagined I would live to see a day when Egyptian Muslims are killing each other," Mohamed said.

"I watched television the other day. I saw the protesters in Tahrir Square praying and I then I saw the ones at Rabaa Adawiya mosque praying, too.

“A few hours later, I see the two sides killing each other. Why? They're all Muslims who pray to the same God."

Egyptians are proud of a reputation for good cheer and party spirit and an ability to show their fellow Arabs a good time.

Housewife Aza Mahmoud, 45, recalled a popular saying that, if you have never celebrated Ramadan in Egypt, you have never celebrated Ramadan.

"After this year, I don't think we can say that anymore,” she said.

For many, Ramadan may offer a religious retreat from Egypt's troubles."To you God we turn when there is nothing else to be one and no one else to turn to,” prayed Yasmine Mohamed, 22, a student.

Reproduced with permission from OnIslam.net




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