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“Allah! For you I've fasted, and with what You give me I break my fast.”

Published: 27/08/2011 10:03:00 AM GMT
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I want to know if it is Sunnah to break our fasts with the supplication: “Bismillâh. Allahumma! Laka sumtu wa `alâ rizqiqa aftartu.”


nswered by

the Fatwa Department Research Committee - chaired by Sheikh `Abd al-Wahhâb al-Turayrî

The supplication is related with various wordings. Though the hadîth is weak, it is good enough be followed for establishing a Sunnah supplication.

The essential wording is as follows:

Allahumma! Laka sumtu wa `alâ rizqiqa aftartu.

“O Allah! For you I have fasted, and with what You give me I break my fast.”

Here are the various narrations of this supplication:

1. Allahumma! Laka sumtu wa `alâ rizqiqa aftartu.

“O Allah! For you I have fasted, and with what You give me I break my fast.”

It is related in this way from Mu`âdh b. Zahrah in Sunan Abî Dawûd (3358) and Sunan al-Bayhaqî (4/239).

The narrator of this hadîth – Mu`âdh b. Zahrah – is a Successor. He never met the Prophet (peace be upon him). He only met the Companions, so this hadîth is mursal.

It is also related with this wording from Abû Hurayrah in Musannaf Ibn Abî Shaybah (9744) by way of Muhammad b. Fudayl from Husayn.

The weakness in the transmission of this narration is mild. It can be followed for establishing a Sunnah supplication.

2. Bismillâh. Allahumma! Laka sumtu wa `alâ rizqiqa aftartu.

“In the name of Allah. O Allah! For you I have fasted, and with what You give me I break my fast.”

It is related in this way from Anas in Mu`jam al-Tabarânî al-Saghîr (p329:894). Ibn Hajar al-Asqalânî says in al-Talkhîs al-Habîr (2/802): “Its chain of transmission is weak. It contains Dâwûd b. Zabraqân who is a rejected narrator.”

3. Allahumma! Laka sumnâ wa `alâ rizqiqa aftarnâ, fa-taqabbal minnâ. Innaka antal-samî` al-`alîm.

“O Allah! For you we have fasted, and with what You give us, we break my fast, so accept it from us. Indeed, You are the one who hears, who knows.”

It is related in this way from Ibn `Abbâs in Sunan al-Dâraqutnî (2/185) and in Mu`jam al-Tabarânî al-Kabîr (12/146: 12720).

However, al-Tabarânî relates it in the singular form (ie “sumtu” instead of “sumnâ”, etc…) and without beginning with the word “Allâhumma!”

Ibn Hajar al-Asqalânî says in al-Talkhîs al-Habîr (2/802): “It is related by al-Tabarânî in al-Mu`jam al-Kabîr and by al-Dâraqutnî from Ibn `Abbâs with a weak chain of transmission.”

4. Allahumma! Laka sumtu wa `alayka tawakkaltu wa `alâ rizqiqa aftartu.

“O Allah! For you I have fasted, and upon You I rely, and with what You give me I break my fast.”

It is related in this way from `Alî b. Abî Tâlib in Musnad al-Hârith as stated by Ibn Hajar al-`Asqalânî in al-Matâlib al-`Aliyah (77 and 1074) and by al-Haythamî in Bughyah al-Bâhith (469).

Ibn Hajar declares this narration to be “extremely weak”.

And Allah knows best.

Source: Islam Today




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